Welcome, Guest. Please Login.
Latex Allergy Support Forum
26.03.19 at 20:45:00
News: We've upgraded to YaBB 2!
Home Help Search Login


Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
New and learning! (Read 1498 times)
Chloe
Newbies
*


!

Posts: 2
Gender: female
New and learning!
19.02.13 at 11:31:58
 
Hello, I just joined thanks to admin help with registration Happy Want to have a little rant to those who understand and hoping to get some answers along the way.
I'm not yet confirmed (waiting for blood results) but I'm type 4 latex mild. I had severe blistering on my hands after repeatedly wearing latex gloves because I thought I was getting dermatitis from cleaning chemicals... whoops! Since that eventually healed I only get very tiny blisters after being in contact with latex and I *think* (can anyone confirm this) it gets worse if I'm super stressed.
 
I also have food reactions, I stopped eating bananas years ago because majority of the time they would cause the roof of my mouth to sting/burn. I also get a really itchy face after eating sometimes but I haven't yet narrowed that down to a particular food. I'm wondering if it is like bananas where I don't react EVERY time I eat it.
 
I'm assuming I've caught my sensitivity quite early compared to what I've read on the internet but I'm so worried about increasing sensitivity. It's really really hard to tell if things are natural rubber unless they absolutely pong with it and I honestly can't afford to replace everything I own with a risk factor and pay over the top prices just because one company kindly put latex free in the description, even though that product would likely never contain latex anyway... I'm paranoid about the most unlikely items.
 
Is it possible to live around a little latex without worsening the sensitivity? Like my partners bike in the kitchen and my food storage having rubber rings? As long as I don't touch the rubber.. Or am I just asking for type 1 trouble with latex particles contaminating and things?
 
Ok I will stop. I have just had so many unanswered frustrations as everyone I speak to seems to know less than me about the subject and it's so hard trying to advise and inform companies when I don't know myself. What if they tell me the item is latex free.. but then I react to the packaging because of that blooming glue?
 
 
One more question.. can anyone advise on medical kits for the home/work/catering? Does anyone know what items NEVER have latex like.. spray plaster? or alcohol wipes etc.. sometimes I think.. as if that will have latex in it.. but then I read a box that says the plasters are latex free but the packaging isn't..
 
Anyway, chuffed to be a part of the forum!
Chloe
Back to top
 
 
  IP Logged
Bob
Global Moderator
*****


.

Posts: 914
Gender: male
Re: New and learning!
Reply #1 - 19.02.13 at 14:11:51
 
Hi Chloe and welcome to the forum.   If I were you I'd avoid latex like the plague.   Most of our members will tell you that they started off as Type 4.   Latex allergy is cumulative and the more contact you have the worse it gets.
 
If you browse these pages you will find loads of advice and nobody minds if you ask questions.
Back to top
 
 

A 'Veteran' - active duty, discharged, retired, or reserve - is one who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check payable to his country for an amount of 'up to, and including his life.'
  IP Logged
Jen
Full Member
***


!

Posts: 81
Gender: female
Re: New and learning!
Reply #2 - 19.02.13 at 23:03:56
 
Hi Chloe and welcome to the forum!
 
When I first started having problems with latex the health professionals thought it was a type IV reaction but it turned out to be a mild type I reaction.  
 
Type IV reactions are due to chemicals present in the glove such as the accelerators, dyes etc and they can also occur if you try latex free gloves containg the same chemicals.
 
Type I is an allergic reaction to latex proteins.  In the early stages the symptoms can be relatively mild, (Hay fever is a Type I reaction, but so is anaphylaxis) but if you keep being exposed to it the reactions will get worse.  Some people find the reactions get worse slowly, others have mild reactions then suddenly the reaction changes to full blown anaphylactic shock without warning.  The problem is you don't know when the reaction will change from mild to severe...
 
The best thing to do with either type of reaction is to avoid exposure to latex.  If you are a type IV you may find that latex free gloves problematic as well.  There are accelerator free gloves, and different colours so you may find others that suit you.
 
There are some people who have both types, which makes diagnosing things much more difficult.  I don't know where you are from but in the UK Type IV reactions are tested for by using patch testing as it can take 48 hours for the rash to appear after exposure.  Type I reactions are tested with blood samples, skin prick testing, challenges, and also the doctors should take into account history of the reactions.  Generally speaking, the type I rash will appear much faster than the type IV one, although in the early days of my allergy my skin rash did take several hours to develop.  It now takes minutes.  
 
Silicon rubber is safe for those who have latex allergy and it can look like latex rubber, so the best test I have is the smell test!  Have a look on the LASG site  - the latex list and that will give you lots of guidance.  
 
Take care and stay safe
 
Jen  
(Type I and Allergy Nurse Specialist - Yes, an interesting combination...lol)
Back to top
 
 
  IP Logged
Pages: 1
Send Topic Print